Skip to main content

2010

The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman

Posted in

Image of The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down
There's been criticism on both side of Anne Fadiman's The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down - it's either too pro-Hmong/Lia Lee's family or too pro-doctor. I've always believed that if neither side of a story is entirely happy with your article or book, then you've done something right.

Next Stop Reloville by Peter T. Kilborn

Posted in

Image of Next Stop, Reloville: Life Inside America's New Rootless Professional Class
After reading several positive reviews, I hunted down Next Stop, Reloville: Life Inside America's New Rootless Professional Class . The book is well-written and researched. It provides an interesting look at the "relo" lifestyle of many Americans, and Kilborn hammers home his thesis of the negative impact on communities like Alpharetta, Georgia.

Amazing Grace by Megan Shull

Posted in

Image of Amazing Grace
While I slog through a book about business and housing, I decided to take a break and spend an evening reading Amazing Grace . I'm trying to read more young adult fiction to get a sense of what's out there.

I suppose you could do worse than read, or have your teen read, Amazing Grace . The heroine, 15-year-old Grace Kincaid, starts the story by leaving behind her stellar tennis career and celebrity status to live undercover as a regular girl in Alaska. (It's all very Hannah Montana meets Northern Exposure).

The Help by Kathryn Stockett

Posted in

Image of The Help
My father went out and bought The Help for me just because he had enjoyed reading it so much. (I think he had already lent his copy to someone, and yes, my father is awesome and a big patron of my book habit.)

Laughing Without an Accent by Firoozeh Dumas

Posted in

Image of Laughing Without an Accent: Adventures of a Global Citizen
A smooth continuation from Funny in Farsi: A Memoir of Growing Up Iranian in America , Dumas continues to write charming essays on life as an Iranian-American. Laughing Without an Accent: Adventures of a Global Citizen tackles more of her adult life, from choosing to take the television out of the house and the effects of that on her children, to dealing with a mother-in-law who seems like she's out of a Grimm fairy tale.

A Reliable Wife by Robert Goolrick

Posted in

It turns out that was the perfect book to read this week. Why, you ask? It's because it takes place in 1907 Wisconsin, which is remarkably similar to Baltimore 2010, currently suffering from Snowpocalypse: The Threequel.

A Perfectly Good Family by Lionel Shriver

Posted in

Image of A Perfectly Good Family: A Novel (P.S.)
A Perfectly Good Family: A Novel (P.S.) has the dubious honor of being the first book of 2010 that I hated.

What's sad about that is I am a big fan of Lionel Shriver - I thought We Need to Talk About Kevin: A Novel (P.S.) and The Post-Birthday World were both great; well-written with an element of mystery that made them both "can't put down" reads.

The premise of A Perfectly Good Family: A Novel (P.S.) is simple: following the death of their parents, three children have to decide whether to sell their childhood home. In order to keep it, two would have to buy the third out.

Expecting Adam by Martha Beck

Posted in

Image of Expecting Adam: A True Story of Birth, Rebirth, and Everyday Magic
So let's start with the easy part - Expecting Adam: A True Story of Birth, Rebirth, and Everyday Magic movingly encapsulates what a Harvard doctoral student went through when she discovered she was pregnant with a child with Down's Syndrome. Martha Beck writes in a brisk style and includes powerful anecdotes about the reaction of her students and family members. She delves into deep questions about intellect, spirituality, and values.

The Guinea Pig Diaries by A.J. Jacobs

Posted in

Image of The Guinea Pig Diaries: My Life as an Experiment
Compared to The Year of Living Biblically: One Man's Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible and The Know-It-All: One Man's Humble Quest to Become the Smartest Person in the World , this collection of essays is a lot lighter, both in scope and length. It's like a primer into the world of A.J. Jacobs, and you will have likely some of these essays elsewhere, such as "My Outsourced Life." That said, many of the essays are incredibly funny, and Jacobs continues to be the eccentric neighbor you wish you had. It's a good place to start with his work, but get this book from the library if you've read the other two.

This Is Where I Leave You by Jonathan Tropper

Posted in

Image of This Is Where I Leave You
Apart from the fact that This Is Where I Leave You is wonderful, which it is, it also was the only thing that made a 5-hour flight to Phoenix bearable, since it was one of those times where I was trapped next to an obese man and the person in front of me put her seat back. And there were unhappy dogs.

Syndicate content